Suferbird News-Links, 49th Edition

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Wild mustangs in California, fracking ban in Florida?, reduced selenium in soils, Alzheimer's treatment, and weight loss—these are some of the featured stories in today's Surferbird News-Links! I wish I could give you my posting schedule, but I don't have one. I'll be bouncing back and forth between writing freelance proposals and meeting up with you here. However, writing and preparing for these Surferbird News-Links is a pleasure! One day, I'd like to write no less than four a week, maybe more.

Because I included an earworm in the last edition of Surferbird News-Links, I've created a new heading in today's edition called "perspectives." And this one's funny. So after all the climate change news, which isn't good, don't forget to have a laugh at the end.

Views

Wild mustangs and mountain ranges (treehugger.com)

Breathtaking! And I learned about the White Mountains and Pizona Range in California, too. I live in California and didn't know.

News-Links

Environment

In Florida, Republicans and environmentalists agree— ban fracking. (sierraclub.org)

Republicans and democrats co-sponsored this bill. Should I repeat that? Amazing. But it's not over, yet, because it has to survive the legislative process. And the governor has ties to the fossil fuel industry. We'll watch and see—here's to hoping the bill makes it.

Canadian glaciers and sea level rise (cleantechnica.com)

Greenland has the largest amount of Arctic ice followed by Canada. A study at the University of California, Irvine, brings to light that melting glaciers in Canada are now a major contributor to seal level rise.

Are we underestimating future extent of sea level rise? (cleantechnica.com)

A paper published in Nature suggests warming oceans play a more important role in glacier melt than rising atmospheric temperatures. The results of the study raise concerns that the ice sheets on Antarctica could melt faster than scientists originally thought.

Food and farming

Relationship between climate change and reduced levels of selenium in soils (enn.com)

The relationship between precipitation and evaporation is the biggest determining factor for selenium amounts in soil. In some areas, selenium levels will increase, at first. But over time, as the planet warms even further, selenium levels are expected to decline in many areas. Check out the map for more details.

Health

It's not simply the calories that count for weight loss (theconversation.com)

Hands down, this is one of the best articles I've read on food and weight loss. In fact, I would normally have to spend a lot of time crawling the web for this information. Also, note the section on resistant starch. This is a fascinating topic to me because I can't tolerate a lot of foods. I need non-processed easy to digest options—without the weight gain.

Effects of climate change on health (dailyclimate.org)

I didn't know that higher levels of carbon dioxide could decrease the nutrients in certain crops. And how should you talk with conservatives about climate change? This is an excellent summary of the CDC meeting that was cancelled because of the election results. Non-government organizations pitched in to save the conference, renaming it the "Climate & Health Meeting." The article provides an excellent summary of current scientific thought on climate change, while also being an easy read.

Using a person's own microbes to treat skin disorders (theatlantic.com)

Can you imagine a personalized eczema treatment that uses bacteria from your own skin? Probiotics for the skin attack offending bacteria while maintaining the beneficial ones.

Science and technology

Evolving theories on how to treat Alzheimer's (theatlantic.com)

Scientists now question the dominant Alzheimer's theory that has persisted for years, which has focused on removing and preventing amyloid protein buildup in the brain. For those of you following the latest information on Alzheimer's, I highly recommend this summary on Alzheimer's research.

Perspectives

Proposal in Sweden for couples to get paid leave for sex breaks (qz.com)

I'll leave you to read the article, but all I can say is—only in Sweden. I got a kick out of this one. Do you think workers could accrue their time off to allow for afterglow? 

Have a great weekend, all!

Laura